Browsing: GUERRILLA

3 - TELEVISION NEWS
GUERRILLA Review: “105” / “106”
0

guerilla excerptSeason 1, Episode 6 – Guerrilla is not about the Black Power Movement. It is about the love triangle among Jas, Marcus and Kent. These three nut bags are more concerned about who is shagging who as opposed to the liberation of Black Brits. They are a classic of example of how not to lead a movement.

3 - TELEVISION NEWS
GUERRILLA Review: “104”
0

guerilla excerptSeason 1, Episode 4 – Well, isn’t this interesting? Guerrilla is giving me life now. I feel like John Ridley’s pen may be revealing something I’ve been feeling all along – Jas is a fraud. Marcus puts it best when he says that she, an immigrant, was to be celebrated while he, a Black man, wants to liberate Black people. Hmph.

3 - TELEVISION NEWS
GUERRILLA Review: “103”
0

guerilla excerptSeason 1, Episode 3 – Here, we go again. Guerrilla is disconnected. Is this a movement for the Unification of People of Color or is this the Black Liberation Movement? Jas believes it is the former while Marcus declares it’s the latter. What am I watching?

3 - TELEVISION NEWS
GUERRILLA Review: “102”
0

guerilla excerptSeason 1, Episode 2 – Guerrilla continues to struggle in justifying why Jas, an Asian woman, is so invested in the Black Liberation Movement in the UK. She ambushes the Rhodesia house, shoots someone, and then terrorizes the other guests. Without knowing her backstory, she just seems like a career activist.

3 - TELEVISION NEWS
GUERRILLA Review: “Pilot”
0

guerilla excerptSeason 1, Episode 1 – Guerilla is boring. Unfortunate because this John Ridley-created series is inspired by the real-life 1971 Black Liberation Movement. Jas and Marcus are at the forefront, and this is what makes it boring. It seems to be more about them justifying their mixed-race relationship than the cause.

Media
Guerrilla — Official Trailer (Freida Pinto, Idris Elba, Babou Ceesay)
0

guerrilla-excerptTells the story of a couple whose relationship and values are tested when they liberate a political prisoner and form a radical underground cell in 1970s London. Their ultimate target becomes the Black Power Desk, a true-life, secretive counter-intelligence unit within the Special Branch dedicated to crushing all forms of black activism.